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i might be stupid but

merrso

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Joined
Dec 22, 2006
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#1
hi i have a philips router with ****** broaband and i have been having some trouble getting it to let me have my pc and laptop online at the same time

the router ip is 19*16*1.2 and i have set it to have an ip range from 19*.16*.1.4 to 19*.16*1.22
as my modem is 19*.16*1.100
and have assigned the ip on the pc's to19*.16*.1.5 and 19*.16*.1.6

and my subnet mask to the usual 255.255.255.0 and my dns servers to 19*.16*.4.100 and 19*.16*.8.100 and my default gateway to 19*.16*.1.100

but if ione is online and someone tries to use the other both get disconected and i have to reboot the router

i think its because the gateway or the dns are set the same for both

so my question is do i need to have different gateways for both pcs and if so how would i go about setting 2 gateways on the router

sorry if the question is not laid out very clearly but its all bloody numbers to me lol
 

beady

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Jun 30, 2007
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#2
First off, I bet your ip addresses are 192.168.1.x? Lol. No need to hide them, they're just internal addresses, not routable from the internet.

Secondly, what have you got your dns pointing at? Your gateway and dns should probably be pointing at your router (i.e. 192.168.1.1). To be honest I'm amazed anything will get on the net at all with settings like you've got. Alternatively, the dns entry could be your isp provided ones (something like 88.34.23.23 (I just made that up)).

Try setting everything to point to your router and see if things get fixed.
 

oneman

VIP Member
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Aug 23, 2007
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#3
I assume you are referring to cable internet seeing as you are talking about having a seperate modem.

There is no need to assign a IP address to the modem, in fact it does not have one. Your ISP will assign the device connected to the modem a public IP address (in this case the router).

Your router provides DHCP and DNS services for your internal network. The DNS server for your internal network should be your router. Your router will then forward any requests that it does not know about to your ISP DNS (the modem gets this from the IP information assigned by the ISP).

The DHCP settings on the router will give a IP address to the client and set the DNS and gateway address to itself.

As long as your clients (workstations and laptop) have got the IP address on thier network cards set to DHCP and the DNS settings saying 'Obtain DNS settings automatically' then you don't need to worry about setting any of the values manually.
 

merrso

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Joined
Dec 22, 2006
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#4
thanks

thanks for the answers

found my problem was the router was playing up on me it worked great for hours and then would just stop sending a signal and neither pc could pick up the signal or if they did it was with local connectivity only so got a new tp link router of amazon and stuck it on with the same passphrase and both have been working away for the past couple of hours