British (English) National Anthem....

Is the Anthem

  • British?

    Votes: 21 38.9%
  • English?

    Votes: 33 61.1%

  • Total voters
    54

MH

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Just had a wee barny with the wife, she was singing/humming "God save the Queer"
She tells me its the British anthem to which I say ballocks its an English anthem.

The reason its English and NOT British is due to the 6th Verse which goes as follows!

6th verse of God Save the Queen

" Lord grant that Marshal Wade
May by thy mighty aid
Victory bring
May he sedition hush
And like a torrent rush
Rebellious Scots to crush
God save the Queen"

For the record I am normal and she is English!
 

HappyH

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I think all Scots will vote it's English & most English folk will vote it's British. I'm Scottish & my boy says he's English so I'll abstain on this one.
HH.
 

jaffa

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I class it as the anthem of the United Kingdom. In things like the commenwealth games, football and other sports, then some of the individual countries use their own anthems.

For the poll I voted British.
 

Ratts

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its deffo not the english national anthem, as england arnt aloud to have one.... lol

england has been trying for years for there own anthem which more than likely to be the song Jerusalem

god save the queen is the british anthem....:proud:
 

MOAMB

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England has no official national anthem of its own; "God Save the Queen" is treated as the English national anthem when England is represented at sporting events (though there are some exceptions to this rule). There is a movement to establish an English national anthem, with Blake and Parry's "Jerusalem" and Elgar's "Land of Hope and Glory" among the top contenders. Scotland and Wales have their own anthems for political and national events and for use at international football, rugby union and other sports in which those nations compete independently.[13] On all occasions Wales' national anthem is "Mae Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau" (Land of my Fathers). Scotland has no single anthem; "Scotland the Brave" was traditionally used until the 1990s, when "Flower of Scotland" was then adopted. In Northern Ireland, "God Save the Queen" is still used as the official anthem.

Source: God Save the Queen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Captin

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I think British.


"God Save the Queen" (alternatively "God Save the King") is an anthem used in a number of Commonwealth realms and British Crown Dependencies. It is the sole national anthem of the United Kingdom and some of its territories; one of the two national anthems of New Zealand (since 1977) and those of Britain's territories that have their own additional local anthem; and the royal anthem of Australia (since 1984), Canada (since 1980[1]), Jamaica, and Tuvalu, as well as Gibraltar and the Isle of Man.[2] In countries not previously part of the British Empire, the tune of "God Save the Queen" has also been used as the basis for different patriotic songs, though still generally connected with royal ceremony. The authorship of the song is unknown, and beyond its first verse, which is consistent, it has many historic and extant versions: Since its first publication, different verses have been added and taken away and, even today, different publications include various selections of verses in various orders.[3] In general only one, or sometimes two verses are sung, but on rare occasions three.[4]

England has no official national anthem of its own; "God Save the Queen" is treated as the English national anthem when England is represented at sporting events (though there are some exceptions to this rule). There is a movement to establish an English national anthem, with Blake and Parry's "Jerusalem" and Elgar's "Land of Hope and Glory" among the top contenders. Scotland and Wales have their own anthems for political and national events and for use at international football, rugby union and other sports in which those nations compete independently.[13] On all occasions Wales' national anthem is "Mae Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau" (Land of my Fathers). Scotland has no single anthem; "Scotland the Brave" was traditionally used until the 1990s, when "Flower of Scotland" was then adopted. In Northern Ireland, "God Save the Queen" is still used as the official anthem.

Around 1745, anti-Jacobite sentiment was captured in a verse appended to the song, with a prayer for the success of Field Marshal George Wade's army then assembling at Newcastle. These words attained some short-term use, although they did not appear in the published version in the October 1745 Gentleman's Magazine. The source of this verse was a later article on the song, published by the Gentleman's Magazine in 1837. Therein, it is presented as an "additional verse... though being of temporary application only... stored in the memory of an old friend... who was born in the very year 1745, and was thus the associate of those who heard it first sung", the lyrics given being:

Lord, grant that Marshal Wade,
May by thy mighty aid,
Victory bring.
May he sedition hush,
and like a torrent rush,
Rebellious Scots to crush,
God save the King.

The 1837 article and other sources make it clear that this verse was not used soon after 1745, and certainly before the song became accepted as the British national anthem in the 1780s and 1790s.[26][27] It was included as an integral part of the song in the Oxford Book of Eighteenth Century Verse of 1926, although erroneously referencing the "fourth verse" to the Gentleman's Magazine article of 1745.[28]

On the opposing side, Jacobite beliefs were demonstrated in an alternative verse used during the same period:[29]

God bless the prince, I pray,
God bless the prince, I pray,
Charlie I mean;
That Scotland we may see
Freed from vile Presbyt'ry,
Both George and his Feckie,
Ever so, Amen.

Various other attempts were made during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries to add verses to commemorate particular royal or national events. For example, according to Fitzroy Maclean, when Jacobite forces bypassed Wade's force and reached Derby, but then retreated and when their garrison at Carlisle Castle surrendered to a second government army led by King George's son, the Duke of Cumberland, another verse was added.[30] Other short-lived verses were notably anti-French, such as the following, quoted in the book Handel by Edward J. Dent:[31]

From France and Pretender
Great Britain defend her,
Foes let them fall;
From foreign slavery,
Priests and their knavery,
And Popish Reverie,
God save us all.

However, none of these additional verses survived into the twentieth century.[32] Other changes were incorporated over time, for example King George V ((1865–1936) asked that the line 'Frustrate their popish tricks' should be changed to 'Frustrate their knavish tricks'.

God Save the Queen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

buzzer

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defo english.....
THE scottish national anthem:
YouTube - The Corries Flower of Scotland (1975 ???)
(should NOT be sung without an arran jumper...)

scottish national flags:
Scottish-Royal-Lion-Rampant-Flag.gif
St-Andrews-Saltire.gif

scottish national drinks:
images
images


scottish national foods:
images
images

no wonder we are all so fookin healthy!!!! lol
 

jeuz

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as mentioned above "Land of Hope and Glory" should be the English anthem, its just a shame were not allowed one.
 

K

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I think God save the queen is the british anthem, England doesnt have an anthem. The england cricket team use Jerusalem which ought to be used for our other national sports..

But at the end of the day its a song??

if people are trying to promote multiculturism.. why do we have anthems??
 

Napster

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i know it as the National Anthem english or british, dont they mean the same thing :)
 

Evastar

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No, English is England, British is the island of Britain, which is England, Scotland and Wales, and the UK is England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.
 

RAB - P

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Always seen it as a British national anthem but could do with updating.

Also think England should have their own anthem may I suggest THIS
 

liambalfour

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nah its english ask any scotish person, unless you sing it to wind up a celtic fan
 

mcgirt

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English for me.

I didn't know that England didn't have a national anthem, I just assumed it was god save the queen, which is why I voted English.

Bit of a shame really.
 

sneaker

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It's not an English Scottish Welsh or Northern Irish anthem, British. It should be called the royal bow down to my Authority anthem.
 

richyrich

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I voted English. She's the Queen of England why would we want god to save her. :)

BTW Who's stopping England having their own anthem? certainly not the Welsh, Scots and Irish.
 
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