Power line adapter

avid

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This may sound like dumb question.
If your upstairs sockets are on separate ring main to your downstairs will they still work. Do they send the signal through the consumer unit to all the sockets connected to the consumer unit. 🤔
 

albob

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I use mine like that (one upstairs, the other downstairs) and they work fine

(normally, the upstairs and the down stairs have separate rings)
 

ketmp

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For last few years, the current AV2 standard, has meant that powerline adapters use neutral/earth which helps with different rings on same CU.
 

ketmp

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The devils devices!
Yes, but many good things from it as well. The cables I'd have to run around the house to be able to use things haha
 

gazupnorth

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What's wrong with powerline adaptors if you don't mind me asking.... Was thinking of getting some to get Internet into me garage at some stage???
 

digidude

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ive used these before now to connect an NVR CCTV system to a camera in a garage, as there was on other way to cable to it, using the 'extesion lead' that the guy had buried in a hose pipe to run a double socket and a light in his garage. The camera was powered by 12v from the socket in the garage, and powerline adaptors used to send the digital video back from the camera to the NVR, through a 4 way extension, plugged into a double socket, that was basicly an extension plugged into the kitchen, on a different ring to where the NVR was in the bedroom

they may not be amazing for streaming 4K or online gaming at lightning speeds sometimes, but, they can get the job done
 

MH

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They are more of an issue if you have ADSL or FTTC.
If you have one near your modem, they can introduce severe electrical noise that will in turn create a lot of FEC errors on your modem. FEC errors are not a bad thing per se as it’s an indication that the modem is handling the corrections. However you can get to a point where too many FECs can induce CRC errors. These are bad, as it requires a retransmission of the bad packet. If there are too many bad packets you can get errored seconds and serious errored seconds. These can cause the DSLAM to retrain your connection to compensate for these errors. This can have an impact on your sync speed and connection throughput.
So they are the devils device!

Run a cable, or use a mesh system.
 

gez

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I have been using one for a few years with no problem, very little speed loss etc. Main one downstairs and tother one upstairs.
 

nara

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I've been using them for at least ten years, in various combinations, in three properties. Never any hint of a problem.
Elaborating on this. I think that a most of the anti-Powerline propaganda is the usual Internet generated hogwash. There may well have been problems with them in the early days, but I've never met anyone who's set them up properly(RTFM!) and had any problems tbh.
 

MH

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Elaborating on this. I think that a most of the anti-Powerline propaganda is the usual Internet generated hogwash. There may well have been problems with them in the early days, but I've never met anyone who's set them up properly(RTFM!) and had any problems tbh.
My comments above relate to actual experience and not some anecdotal hogwash.
They were installed and working fine for around 6 months, then out of the blue I stated getting random disconnects. Each disconnect resulted in a reduction in sync speed, which in turn reduces the throughput.
If you are wondering how I knew what the cause was and the resulting effect I run software on my pi to monitor the stats on my router and graph them.

DSLstats Home page
 

dar1437

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My comments above relate to actual experience and not some anecdotal hogwash.
They were installed and working fine for around 6 months, then out of the blue I stated getting random disconnects. Each disconnect resulted in a reduction in sync speed, which in turn reduces the throughput.
If you are wondering how I knew what the cause was and the resulting effect I run software on my pi to monitor the stats on my router and graph them.

DSLstats Home page
Was this test on recent adaptors, or older ones? :)

Also, i notice there's a sort of pairing button on them, which i don't think i actually used lol (does that make a difference?)
 

avid

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Was this test on recent adaptors, or older ones? :)

Also, i notice there's a sort of pairing button on them, which i don't think i actually used lol (does that make a difference?)
Yes!

(...remember the RTFM bit) :)

This may be what you are referring to taken from another forum

Thought I'd chip in here...
I had a pair of PA 211...(Full size) Kit adapters across two separate ring circuits on two different fuse boards at mine. Both fuse boards ultimately (normally if its still all one house!) go through the same meter so it deffo works.
I have since added a further pair of the nano variety and all I did was to download the utility others have mentioned, reset the plugs (via the utility) and place them next to one another, double socket side by side and press the pair button. I did all this with a laptop wired up to at least one plug whilst running the utility and kept adding the plugs to the group (homeplugAV or something, its the default setting)
I must add, some of my plugs do not have the network light flashing away (only two out of three lights on a plug flash), but once they were all paired it made no difference. They still all work.
 

MH

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Was this test on recent adaptors, or older ones? :)

Also, i notice there's a sort of pairing button on them, which i don't think i actually used lol (does that make a difference?)
I had them about 3 years, ago. I actually had them replaced under an RMA as I was able to plot the impact of them being on and off.

Also to satisfy @nara they were set up using the utility and were running the latest firmware. So no need to RTFM.........
 
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