Surname Origin

Ratts

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my surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin,

and first appeared in the 11th century ......
 

willin

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This is what it said about mine

"Please accept our appologies but this surname has yet to be researched."
 

RAB - P

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This interesting surname may be of Scottish locational origin from a place in Strathclyde,

It may also be of Ashkenazic and German origin, being an ethnic name for someone from Poland. In the case of the Ashkenazic name, the reference is to a person of Hebrew origin from Poland or from some other Slavonic speaking region.

The surname dates back to the late 12th Century

pmsl @ Jaffa.
 

Evastar

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lol of irish origin dating back to pre 9th century, and probably meaning descendant of the vikings ;)
 

gez

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Please accept our appologies but this surname has yet to be researched.
 

witchy

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This interesting surname may be of Scottish locational origin from a place in Strathclyde,

It may also be of Ashkenazic and German origin, being an ethnic name for someone from Poland. In the case of the Ashkenazic name, the reference is to a person of Hebrew origin from Poland or from some other Slavonic speaking region.

The surname dates back to the late 12th Century
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Mine is Scottish, we used to steal sheep from the banks of Loch Lomond. :)
 
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notanotherone

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mines goes back to the 7th century and my middle name is Scottish Gaelic and the Irish Gaelic It was the name adopted by the Pharisee Saul of Tarsus after his conversion to Christianity on the road to Damascus (A.D. circa 34). He was a most energetic missionary to the gentiles in the Roman Empire, and perhaps played a more significant role than any other of Christ's followers in establishing Christianity as a major world religion.
 

manxspud

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This interesting and unusual name is of Anglo-Saxon origin... is recorded in the Domesday Book, of 1086 ... derived from the Old English pre 7th Century personal name...

I also put in my mothers maiden name ... Galbraith ...



This interesting and famous surname recorded in several spellings including Galbraith, Galbraeth and even Calbaith, is Scottish. It originated as a nickname for a member of the Briton tribe of Strathclyde who settled amongst the Gaels in the 7th century. In Gaelic the name is written Mac galle Bhreathnach, from "mac", meaning son of, "gall", a stranger, and "Breathnach", a Briton. It is likely that these Britons migrated northwards at the time of the Anglo-Saxon or Norse-Viking invasions of the mainland, although this is not proven. The surname is first recorded in the early 13th century, (see below). In a Lennox charter believed to have an earlier date, the first name holder appears as Gillescop Galbrad. It is interesting to note that the area of Lennox near Dumbarton was known as "the kingdom of the Britons" up to 1124. Three carucates of land in Lennox were granted by Maldouen the earl to William, son of Arthur, son of Galbrat in 1238 and in 1246, one Gillaspec Galbraith witnessed the grant of the lands of Colquhoune to Umfridus de Kilpatrick, The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Gillescop Galbrath. He witnessed a gift of land to Campsie Church, which was dated circa 1208, in the "Episcopal Register of Glasgow", during the reign of King William, known as "The Lion of Scotland", 1165 - 1214. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

So my dad is Yorkshire ... my mum is Irish with Scottish roots ... and i was born in the isle of man.

Made for good reading ... many thanks for the link.

@manx
 

thomasjcat

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This very interesting name is of early medieval Anglo-Scottish origins. Introduced by the Norman French after the Invasion of England in 1066, it was a metonymic occupational surname for someone who was originally in charge of the pantry of a great house or monastery. The term derives from the pre 10th century Old French word "despense", from the Latin "dispendere", meaning to weigh out or dispense. In Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales", the glutton in the Sumner's Tale is described as being "all vinolent as botel in the spense". The modern surname can be found as Spence, Spencer, and the Scottish form Spens, Spenser and Despenser. In the Governor's lists of inhabitants of the colony of Virginia, New England, and compiled on February 16th 1623, one William Spence, his wife, and their child, are shown as living at James' Island, near "Elizabeth Cittee! A coat of arms depicting a black boar's head erased between two red bars on a silver shield, with the Motto "Patior ut Potiar" (I endure as I enjoy), was granted to a family of the name at Berryholl in Fife, Scotland. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Simon del Spens. This was dated 1300, in the Charters of Guisburn Priory, Yorkshire, during the reign of King Edward 1st, known as "The Hammer of the Scots", 1272 - 1307. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was sometimes known as the Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Read more: Surname Database: Spence Last Name Origin
 

stevie1ball

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Here's mine


This interesting surname, with variant spellings Con, Cone, Connell, Connelly, Connor, Couroy and Conne, widespread in the Auchry area of Aberdeenshire, and in the Province of Ulster, is an Anglicized form of the old Scots Gaelic "Siol Cuin" or "Con", literally meaning "the seed or race of Con", a byname from the Gaelic "con", hound. Bearers of this name proudly claim to be a branch of the great Clan Donald, through descent from a 13th Century William Con, "lauchfull sonne to Donald of the Iles and Kyntyr, chief of the Mackdonald". Members of this clan came to Ireland in the 13th Century and established themselves as gallowglasses in Ulster. However, in this Province, Conn may also derive from MacConn, itself, an Anglicized form of the rare County Down patronymic Mac Mhiolchon, "son of the hound-like one". George Con was the Pope's agent at the court of Charles 1's queen (1636 - 1639); Agnes, daughter of Robert Conn, was christened in Drumbo Presbyterian, County Down, on August 1st 1707, and on April 9th 1847 Catherine Conn was a famine emigrant to New York City. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of William Conn, witness to the laird of Balfour's bond, which was dated 1552, "Records of Aberdeenshire", Scotland, during the reign of Queen Mary, known as "Mary Queen of Scots", 1542 - 1567. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.
 

Rat

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ooooo Scottish



This notable surname is regarded as Anglo-Scottish. It has over twenty-five entries in the British "Dictionary of National Biography", and no less than thirty coats of arms

The origination is from the pre 7th century Olde English
 

Spectre

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We saw a site like this ages ago but it was spoof, it faked the responses.

Now, call me cynical but maybe it is the same thing with an improved back end.

Can anyone verify what it comes up with? It looks authentic but if you search for the response there are a few sites with the same thing.


Here's the postmodernism generator, refresh for more nonsense:

http://www.elsewhere.org/pomo/
 
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