Splitter ?

svkhtn

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Hi,

I checked on fleabay and found there are many types of splitters for NTL there. Sometimes, they have different specifications. I am wondering if it affects the signal of the cable or limits the ability of the dbox (i.e. fewer channels etc.) ?

For example, there is one with 5-1000MHz. Another one says 5-2400MHz. My friend has one with 5-2500MHz.
And, one with 3.7db; another with 6.2db etc.

I am a bit confused.

I also open the NTL white box at home. I found there is a Qamtec TV/Data isolator with 5-1000Mhz. What is it used for? Can I remove it and replace with a splitter?

Thanks !!!
SV
 

stargazer

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leave the one outside. get a qamtex vq1002 splitter from e*ay. this has an output of 3.7bd ( approx half the signal level) and a band pass of 5 to 1000MHz. This will let you split your signal in half and not effect your broadband. Be aware that other splitters with higher frequency band pass can cause you problems as they let harmonics through...
 

ikonos

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hi there , i use a splitter 5-2450 mhz that i bought off ebay. I connected this to my broadband cable.

I had braodband cable - splitter - cable to modem and also cable to dbox and I have never had any problems.

Jean
 

svkhtn

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So, technically, Which one is better? 5-1000MHz or 5-2400Mhz ?
And, how much db for the output is good ? I saw some say 3.2db, 3.7db, 6.2db (?)

At the moment, I want to buy a 3-way splitter. I don't know whether the quality of the signal will go down a lot? If it does, I think I just go for the 2-way splitter.

Is anyone using a 3-way splitter without booster? What made of the splitter are you using? Is it good? What is its specification (i.e. db and Mhz on each output)?

Thanks !
 

scott-ayling

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yea i have a 4way splitter and no booster and i get perfect picture on all boxes and no problem with modem .i have subbed modem downstairs and dbox downstairs and another dbox in my room upstairs and subbed box in bairns room upstairs
 

svkhtn

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Can you tell me the specification of your splitter (i.e. Brandname, MHz, and db on each output)?

Thanks!

scott-ayling said:
yea i have a 4way splitter and no booster and i get perfect picture on all boxes and no problem with modem .i have subbed modem downstairs and dbox downstairs and another dbox in my room upstairs and subbed box in bairns room upstairs
 

scott-ayling

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ill let you know tomoro mate im at work now and cant remember the full spec
 

mgb

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@svkhtn
The cable co's are using frequencies between 100 and 900 mhz. Both or your mentioned splitters let pass such frequencies.
On a 2way splitter you lose about 3 db signal strength and on 4 way splitter about 6 db. Depending on the original signal strength you may need a booster to compensate that loss of signal strength.
 

svkhtn

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@mgb: thanks very much.

By the way, when I opened the NTL white box, I found a TV/Data isolator with 5-1000MHz. Does it mean that the frequency on the cable is wider in range. They use it to filter down to 5-1000Mhz so that it is not harmful to your electronic devices? Is it right?

So, if I have a 3-way splitter saying 5-1000Mhz, should I remove the one in the NTL white box and use mine; or I should install it behind the one in the white box. Is it better? (because I think that the splitter will filter down to 5-1000Mhz range anyway. If there are more junctions/connections (i.e. leave a isolator there), it will downgrade the signal).

Thanks!
SV
 

mgb

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On cable networks there are only frequencies up to 900 mhz in use. The frequency range printed on a splitter says in which range the thing is functionable.
 
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