Scene member facing up to 5 years in prison

janobi

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A member of an online piracy group has been convicted of conspiracy to commit criminal copyright infringement and faces up to five years in prison. Barry Gitarts, 25, of Brooklyn, New York, was convicted Thursday in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia. In addition to up to five years in prison, Gitarts could face a fine of US$250,000, three years of probation and a requirement that he make full restitution, the DOJ said. Gitarts was a key member of the Internet music piracy group Apocalypse Production Crew (APC) from at least June 2003 through April 2004, the DOJ said. Gitarts paid for and administered a computer server located in Texas that APC group members used to upload and download hundreds of thousands of copies of pirated music, movies, software and video games, the agency said.

Gitarts also received payment from the leader of APC, the DOJ said. APC was a “first-provider” or “release group” of unauthorized materials online, the agency said. Release groups are the original sources for a majority of the pirated works downloaded through the Internet, the DOJ said. “Music piracy is stealing and, unless you want to end up in a federal prison, don’t do it,” Chuck Rosenberg, U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia, said in a statement. The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) praised federal authorities for bringing the case to trial. The Gitarts case was the first time a federal prosecution of an online criminal copyright infringement case primarily featuring music has gone to trial, the RIAA said. The Gitarts case is part of an ongoing federal investigation into the organized piracy groups responsible for the distribution of movies, software, games and music on the Internet. There have been 15 criminal convictions of APC members and 56 total convictions in Operation FastLink, an international investigation into Internet piracy.

Source: PC World
 

mapman

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A member of an online piracy group has been convicted of conspiracy to commit criminal copyright infringement and faces up to five years in prison. Barry Gitarts, 25, of Brooklyn, New York, was convicted Thursday in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia. In addition to up to five years in prison, Gitarts could face a fine of US$250,000, three years of probation and a requirement that he make full restitution, the DOJ said. Gitarts was a key member of the Internet music piracy group Apocalypse Production Crew (APC) from at least June 2003 through April 2004, the DOJ said. Gitarts paid for and administered a computer server located in Texas that APC group members used to upload and download hundreds of thousands of copies of pirated music, movies, software and video games, the agency said.

Gitarts also received payment from the leader of APC, the DOJ said. APC was a “first-provider” or “release group” of unauthorized materials online, the agency said. Release groups are the original sources for a majority of the pirated works downloaded through the Internet, the DOJ said. “Music piracy is stealing and, unless you want to end up in a federal prison, don’t do it,” Chuck Rosenberg, U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia, said in a statement. The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) praised federal authorities for bringing the case to trial. The Gitarts case was the first time a federal prosecution of an online criminal copyright infringement case primarily featuring music has gone to trial, the RIAA said. The Gitarts case is part of an ongoing federal investigation into the organized piracy groups responsible for the distribution of movies, software, games and music on the Internet. There have been 15 criminal convictions of APC members and 56 total convictions in Operation FastLink, an international investigation into Internet piracy.

Source: PC World

looks like they want to set example wow 5 years .
need to keep low when you are doing stuff
 

wonko

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they are locking up the wrong people - the people who should be being locked up are the criminals ripping off the public - they go not by names such as APC but by names like RIAA and MPAA
 

pipsqueaker

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they are locking up the wrong people - the people who should be being locked up are the criminals ripping off the public - they go not by names such as APC but by names like RIAA and MPAA

Exactly mate!!!!

I cannot believe that so much of the world's authorities spend so much of their time and the people's money looking after these rip-off gits.
 

jaffa

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they are locking up the wrong people - the people who should be being locked up are the criminals ripping off the public - they go not by names such as APC but by names like RIAA and MPAA

Totally agree..if they were not so greedy then people would pay.

Exactly mate!!!!

I cannot believe that so much of the world's authorities spend so much of their time and the people's money looking after these rip-off gits.

Its all about money m8, they get no tax if you download pirated stuff, its wrong but I dont see them ever listening to us.
 

pipsqueaker

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Totally agree..if they were not so greedy then people would pay.



Its all about money m8, they get no tax if you download pirated stuff, its wrong but I dont see them ever listening to us.

The only country where any voice from the people is heard is Sweden.
They have a political party called the 'piracy party'.
They got quite a good percentage of votes (enough for the government to take notice) and their leader is
talking to the government with very valid points of discussion.
 

karym6

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hang on a bit - APC put out loads of matieral for download, I have no idea if they did this for free or not, but I bet that a good portion of the stuff they did ended up on dvd's etc down the carboot sale.

I dont think anyone can fault them for breaking copyright protection, after all whats the point if no one wanted to have a go cracking it etc? But maybe they should have covered their backs better than this...
 

wonko

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he was running a server - not selling dodgy copies down a car boot - any one else here running a server? p2p for instance? - fancy 5 years for your trouble?

what people do with it after download isnt the responsibility of the person hosting - in fact an arguement couldl be made that if there were more of these servers then people wouldnt be knocking stuff out at car boots as there would be no market

however - since you brought it up - what exactly is peoples objection - ie tradeing standards etc - to people knocking off copies at a car boot etc - as long as the public are fully aware that it isnt retail then whats the issue - it's hardly counterfeit as it isnt trying to fool anyone it's the real item - so why shoudl trading standards (an organisation supposedly there to protect the public against dodgy merchants/ise) or the police (an organisation supposedly there to protect the public from criminals) be at all interested in what is a civil matter of copyright infrigment - why should scarce public resources be used to bolster the mob style tactics of the studios hit squads?

how, at the end of the day, is some bloke knocking out dodgy copies of xp or the latest popular dvd's doing anything to harm the public? let alone some guy running a server to distrubte a few bits of stuff around the net - isnt that what not just what the net is for but, when reduced to fundamentals, what the net actually is?

the current trend of locking up people for what at worst is imaginary (ie not in the real world) "crime" is a little disturbing to say the least.
 

Jooooles

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americans are potty they say 5 year max he probably will get a massive fine and probation still i bet he wishes he didnt spend so much time on the net lol wonder if he did it too make money are better still to fcuk the robbing twats who charge £12 a cd which costs 2 pence to make


either way i wish him luck lifes a biatttch sometimes
 

zerofool2005

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Gitarts paid for and administered a computer server located in Texas

Now thats where you ballsed up. Ive seen so many piracy groups who ask for US/EU servers. BUT WHY?

The feds can just get a search warrent like that *clicks fingers*

But if you stick them in a nice F.U Bush country like Iraq nobody will touch them
 

dont do it it"ll hurt

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A member of an online piracy group has been convicted of conspiracy to commit criminal copyright infringement and faces up to five years in prison. Barry Gitarts, 25, of Brooklyn, New York, was convicted Thursday in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia. In addition to up to five years in prison, Gitarts could face a fine of US$250,000, three years of probation and a requirement that he make full restitution, the DOJ said. Gitarts was a key member of the Internet music piracy group Apocalypse Production Crew (APC) from at least June 2003 through April 2004, the DOJ said. Gitarts paid for and administered a computer server located in Texas that APC group members used to upload and download hundreds of thousands of copies of pirated music, movies, software and video games, the agency said.

Gitarts also received payment from the leader of APC, the DOJ said. APC was a “first-provider” or “release group” of unauthorized materials online, the agency said. Release groups are the original sources for a majority of the pirated works downloaded through the Internet, the DOJ said. “Music piracy is stealing and, unless you want to end up in a federal prison, don’t do it,” Chuck Rosenberg, U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia, said in a statement. The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) praised federal authorities for bringing the case to trial. The Gitarts case was the first time a federal prosecution of an online criminal copyright infringement case primarily featuring music has gone to trial, the RIAA said. The Gitarts case is part of an ongoing federal investigation into the organized piracy groups responsible for the distribution of movies, software, games and music on the Internet. There have been 15 criminal convictions of APC members and 56 total convictions in Operation FastLink, an international investigation into Internet piracy.

Source: PC World

bloody hell i'm know all over the place
now wot was this all about ?? ooooooo yes
he shoudl of not got cought should he
 
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