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Is this the world's hottest curry? The Bombay Burner

DiamondGeezer

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#1
A curry so hot it requires diners to sign a disclaimer before eating has been launched.

The Bombay Burner sees two of the world's hottest chillies, the Dorset Naga and the Scotch Bonnet, brought together for the lamb-based dish.

The Dorset Naga registers 1million on the Scoville Scale, which measures the spiciness of chillies – just one level down from the pepper

A curry so hot it requires diners to sign a disclaimer before eating has been launched.

The Bombay Burner sees two of the world's hottest chillies, the Dorset Naga and the Scotch Bonnet, brought together for the lamb-based dish.

The Dorset Naga registers 1million on the Scoville Scale, which measures the spiciness of chillies – just one level down from the pepper spray used by US police.

Metro food editor Chloe Scott said: 'It is the seeds of the pepper which make it unbearably hot.

The chemical in chillies, the capsaicin, doesn't burn but fools the brain into feeling pain.'

The curry is available at London restaurant The Cinnamon Club.

Executive chef Vivek Singh said: 'It's the hottest thing I've ever tried – we are looking at getting it into Guinness World Records.' His tip for getting rid of the heat – which can last for up to half an hour after the meal – is to sip yoghurt or ice-cold milk.

The curry was made for the launch of ****** Media's new Bollywood service.

Here's what Metro's lucky taster James Ellis made of the dish:

I've tried the Bombay Burner and, while scorchingly spicy, it is daal-icious.

The lamb-based curry is innocuous enough at the first bite – especially if you only try the filling.

But a mouthful including the Scotch bonnet casing saw my tastebuds melt in fury at the inferno in my mouth.

Meanwhile, my heartbeat, which started at a resting pace of 68 beats per minute, zoomed up to 128 – the equivalent of doing aerobic exercise. Still, a trip to the Cinnamon Club beats a session in the gym.

http://www.metro.co.uk/news/article.html?in_article_id=211253&in_page_id=34

I went to this restaurant back last January and it is one of the best I ever been to
http://www.cinnamonclub.com/
 

nara

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#2
Eating painfully hot curries is more about being macho than about enjoying the food. At that level of spiciness you can't actually taste anything.
 

knifehandchop

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#3
If you did eat the curry I bet you would have a ring of fire the next day, so keep that toilet paper in the fridge.
 
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Munkey

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#4
I am very surprised the The Cinnamon Club offer this dish. I have eaten at this restaurant on a few occasions and the food is a fusion between Colonial Indian cuisine (chicken tikka masala etc) and authentic Punjabi dishes. Nothing spicy at all.

The reason they make you sign the disclaimer is that old farts (politicians etc) eat at this restaurant, most of them are close to dying anyhow.

Sounds like a PR exercise.
 

witchy

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#5
Eating painfully hot curries is more about being macho than about enjoying the food. At that level of spiciness you can't actually taste anything.
So true mate, you reach a point where you can't taste it any longer as your taste buds go into melt-down, only the pain receptors seem to work.

I love a good hot curry, but I prefer a good mix of flavour and heat, too much heat makes for a very bland meal indeed.