Internet firms in purge on pirates

DiamondGeezer

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BRITAIN’S six top internet service providers have agreed to clamp down on illegal downloading of music and films.

BT, ****** Media, Orange, Tiscali, BSkyB and Carphone Warehouse have signed up to the Government-backed drive.

They will send letters to thousands of the most prolific downloaders telling them their activity is being monitored, ministers will announce today.

Many parents may learn for the first time that their kids are using bedroom PCs and laptops for piracy of copyright-protected music.

Around 6.5million Brits are thought to have downloaded files illegally over the past year. It could cost the music industry an estimated £1billion over the next five years.

http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/article1464262.ece
 

MFCGMFC

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as soon as i finished reading this the same story came on GMTV

i tkae this is just for the subb folk ;)

Cheers
MFCGAVMFC
 

MFCGMFC

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poor music industry :Cry:
i feel sorry for them now :(
i'm going to start buying all my music and films legaly :Clap:



NOT

Excellant response mate hahahahaha

Get It Right Up Them!

Cheers
MFCGAVMFC
 

Rat

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say they do this ?
could they do this realisticly ?

slow peoples speed down so it makes it not worth the hassle
 

DiamondGeezer

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2 packs of blank dvds?!?!?!?!?!

lol

Cheers
MFCGAVMFC

they did seem to suggest there would be a film on it but we'll see when it arrives lol

A while back I ordered a genesis live concert cd - 2 cd pack from amazon

anyway the cd's were labeled accordingly CD1 with track list and CD2 with tracklist but the tracks on CD2 were a duplicate of CD1 - hence the same tracks twice and no CD2 tracks even though they were labeled 1 & 2

I ended up downloading CD2 tracks from the net
 

Munkey

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Are people who use newsgroups and rapidshare immune from this ISP initiative?
 

dollisp

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Think its is targeting the P2P applications and torrents to be honest
 

daveleebond

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they will probably use some kind of anti terror law saying people d/load and sell at car boots to raise money for terrorist groups.
 

Rat

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I think he was joking karym6 ;) lol
 

daveleebond

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i kind of was, but have you not seen ll the ads about selling cheap cigs etc, and back up the line it goes to fund crime/terrorism/drugs.

i go to a car boot in s8lford and there is about 30 stalls selling pirate stuff, all organised between each other, they must make a fortune, where does all this money go?

everyone knows about it, police doont care never been raided, but they must get there source files from somewhere, prob p2p or n/groups on 24/7

my newsgroup is ssl, can it be traced to me?

and how would they tell the difference between p2p and WoW?
 
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GTO

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my problem with it is, bbc,itv, ch5,sky all have adverts saying catch up with all the programs you missed by downloading them now.
so how can they tell if your downloading illegalaly or just catching up on leagal tv shows/films.

also on the gadget show they had apple tv, and it took 4hours to download a blueray film, it was paid for but very large file size. so how many of them before they clamp your connection.
 
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daveleebond

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it's just another of our privacies gone.

internet usage, cctv(including that number plate recognition stuff)

George Orwell had it nailed.
 

nozzer

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From what i've heard its the p2p networks (torrents etc) themselves that are monitored rather than your particular bandwidth. Once evidence has been aquired that a particular IP is downloading illegal content then the relevant isp's are informed and generate a letter to the customer who was using the IP at the time of the download.........

I dont think the ISP's themselves are actually monitoring anything. Evidence is gathered by some third party employed by the music/film industry.
 
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Joe1989

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What abotu BBC I player, 4OD, i download a shit load of stuff of there - how can they tell if its from there or from torrent, Espically since my torrents are ssl. There no way they would acuully view the data...ebcause shurelyt thats gotta be invasion of privacey..
 

hamba

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Illegal filesharing: ISPs pledge not to 'spy' on web users


Internet service providers have pledged not to "spy" on the web habits of customers as part of an agreement with the government to punish illegal sharing of music and films.

Fears have been raised after six of the UK's biggest ISPs agreed with the government, music industry body the BPI and the Motion Picture Association to significantly reduce illegal filesharing in the UK within three years.

The BPI clarified today that there would be no policing by the ISPs or any "spying" because no personal information was gathered in identifying which internet protocol addresses are illegally filesharing.

The BPI chief executive, Geoff Taylor, said in a conference call this morning that the focus was on uploaders of illegal content.

He denied reports that a levy on internet users of up to £30 had been considered or tabled with government.

As part of the memorandum of understanding - signed by BT, ******, Carphone Warehouse, Orange, Tiscali and BSkyB - a pilot three-step process will be used to identify repeat offenders.

The first step is a letter, "intended to be educational" to an internet user about the "account abuse", the second a suspension of the account until the customers agrees in writing not to offend again, and the final step is cancelling an account.

Rights holders will consider prosecuting particularly serious infringers.

The ISPs have agreed to send out 1,000 letters a week in a three-month trial to subscribers who have been identified by the BPI as having been engaged in illicit uploading or downloading of music.

According to one source the door has been left open for the agreement to extend in the future to include TV companies and the computer games industry.

The agreement was announced today as the Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform published a consultation on the regulatory options to punish ISPs if they fail to take more action.

The government prefers a co-regulatory approach but had threatened to introduce legislation as soon as next April if progress was not made.

The consultation will look at measures for punishing offenders that could include blocking people from downloading certain materials or slowing their internet connection.

"I think the memorandum of understanding could be enough to stave off the threat of legislation," said John Enser, a media partner at legal firm Olswang.

"I'm not sure the government has the stomach to push it through. It is not a vote-winner and it is an issue that could be turned against them."

A source said that the memorandum will need to be extended to include other groups such as Apple.

According to a report from Jupiter Research, 20% of European iPod owners buy digital music at least once a month, while 30% use filesharing networks to download music illegally at least once a month.

"We will still require that the proper legal process is followed before the release of data or escalation to other similar actions against any of our customers," said a spokeswoman for Tiscali.

"But the memorandum of understanding has brought together the major ISPs and the music/movie industries, under the leadership of Ofcom our regulator, which is a significant improvement on where we stood before."






Mark Sweney
Thursday July 24, 2008
guardian.co.uk
© Guardian News and Media Limited 2008
 
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