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Sensible Topic EYE Lazer treatment

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Napster, Feb 26, 2016.

  1. Napster

    Napster Global Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Advise please

    As title says has any been thought EYE Lazar treatment, I have to start mine Monday and to been honest I don't like the sound of it, what's involved has anyone had this done to them and what can I expect (does it hurt)because to me it sounds like it will.

    cheers
     
  2. manic01

    manic01 VIP Member VIP Member

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    They just take them out, sand them down abit then plop em back in, stop being a cissy lol
    Hopefully they are put back in correct sockets as could be a bummer otherwise.
    [​IMG]
     
  3. darren221980

    darren221980 VIP Member VIP Member

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    I had laser eye surgery in June 2014 as was short sighted in both eyes (-2.5) in both. Had been wearing contacts and glasses for around 7 years previously.

    The surgery consisted of having eye drops put into one eye, and then a device put over my eye to stop me closing my eye and also lightly sucking onto my eye ball to keep it still. At this point i was asked to look at a red dot with this eye and the laser then started to cut a flap on the surface of my eye to create a flap. The laser was only on for a few seconds. Once done the surgeon then folded the flap over and then moved me over to another laser, made me look at a red dot again and then the laser started working on my cornea to correct my vision. Again this was done in a few seconds. They then put eye drops in to clean the eye and the surgeon then folded the eye flap back over my cornea and used a brush like tool to make sure the flap was completely flat over my eye.

    He then did this same procedure on my other eye. I was probably in the surgery for around 10 - 15 minutes. It took more time to prepare than it did to have the surgery.

    There was no pain during the procedure, however the first day or two eyes were slightly irritated, a little like having sand in your eyes but they give you eye drops to overcome this.

    My one eye also stayed bloodshot for 2 weeks but sight has been perfect since.

    One thing i would advise though is that if you work in IT, stay away from any industrial air con units after laser eye surgery for a while as they dry your eyes out quite a bit. I had to use eye drops daily to over come this until i stopped working in rooms with these air con units in.

    I would post you some links to read up on however struggling to load anything up here in my hotel room in China :(

    There are plenty of videos on Youtube of the procedure being done to watch too.

    Edit - Forgot to point out, literally minutes after having the surgery i could see just as well as i could when wearing contacts or glasses previously.
     
  4. ROBsLab

    ROBsLab New Member

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    There are two types of laser surgery. LASEK and LASIK.
    davidgartry.co.uk is a good resource in my opinion as to what to expect and includes (his) results. He was the first consultant/surgeon to perform the procedure in the UK.

    The worse your eyes are, the less successful the results; but you should, if performed correctly, see a good improvement and it may be possible to return for a second treatment (I guess this could depend on the individual though).

    If it's cheap, it may be too good to be true. The regulations are not strong, as companies complained when they tried to bring a good set of regulations in, but they do have something which is better than nothing.

    As usual, use common sense and it's never a bad thing to do your research. :) Ask about the procedure, what their qualifications are, how many they have performed and whether they hold a certificate in Laser Refractive Surgery.

    There is always a risk but that's the same with any procedure. However, hundreds of thousands of people have had a successful procedure. If in doubt and you're not confident with who you choose to go with to undertake eye surgery, don't do it or find someone else you would be comfortable with.

    I hope this helps,
    ROBsLab :cool:.
     
  5. Napster

    Napster Global Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Cant remember what they called mine but I have bleeding in the back of my eyes and they gave me lazer treatment to fix it they have done the right eye first there was a little pain but not much, the worst thing was they shot the lazer about 50 times all over my eye and the first thing I did was throw up made me feel really sick, now all pain has gone and I go back in Tuesday to see if it worked ant have left done the same,

    any one got a barf bag :(
     
  6. Seedy_r0m

    Seedy_r0m Well-Known Member

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    @darren221980 & @Napster,

    How are the both of you doing since your surgery?

    I've just lost my second pair of prescription lenses (with wraparound Ray-ban frames, no less) to Poseidon, and I'm getting mightily p155ed off about it all, especially since it's costing me £350 each time a bl00dy wave decides to sneak up behind me and knock my shades off my rapidly expanding forehead!

    Sure the house insurance will pay it, but they will also bump next year's premium up by the same amount to cover the cost. No risk business??? Where do I sign up???

    What are your thoughts about Laser Eye Surgery now that you've had some time to experience it first hand for a few months?

    I myself am able to focus perfectly on objects as long as they are within PC Monitor range. Anything further than that generally appears blurred, so my treatment would be what you would call mild.

    Questions:

    1. What procedure did you go for?

    2. How much did it cost in total?

    3. What condition was the procedure for?

    4. Was it worth it in your opinion?

    5. Would you do the same again?

    6. If not, why not?

    7. Would you book your Mother into the same procedure?

    8. If not, why not?

    All thoughts regarding eye surgery are more than welcome.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 28, 2017
  7. darren221980

    darren221980 VIP Member VIP Member

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    Well it's been over 2 years since i had my surgery. I had my last check up in May and still have better than 20 / 20 vision so i've very pleased still. I just wish i had the surgery a few years earlier however i was too scared of having it done as at the time there was only the Lasek optin where the surgeon uses a blade to cut a flap. I don't care how good the surgeon is, i'm not letting him loose with a blade near my eyes.

    1. What procedure did you go for? Lasik.

    2. How much did it cost in total? £3100 over two years so now all paid off :)

    3. What condition was the procedure for? Shortsightedness. I could just about read things on PC monitor at arms length and had been known to walk past my own mother in shops and not recognize her due to being so short sighted.

    4. Was it worth it in your opinion? Hell yes!

    5. Would you do the same again? Definately.

    6. If not, why not?

    7. Would you book your Mother into the same procedure? Yes, although I don't think she'd want it.

    8. If not, why not?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 28, 2017
  8. Seedy_r0m

    Seedy_r0m Well-Known Member

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    Cheers @darren221980,

    I booked myself in for a consultation yesterday and had all the usual eye tests as well as a spinney blue light which built up a 3d image of my eye. In addition to this, I was given eye drops which made my pupils the size of 5p pieces. Also, as it was a bright sunny day in Edinburgh yesterday (for parts anyway) it made everyone wearing bright colours look as if they had stepped right out of the movie Cocoon.

    Anyway, I opted for the Ilasik procedure on my left eye, the reason being is that I have pretty decent near vision in my right, so if they can zap my left into good shape, I should have good vision all round.

    My consultation with the surgeon is on the 31st, and if all being well, the procedure will take place on the 7th of next month.

    The cheaper procedure is £595 per eye, however as I opted for the crème de la crème (as it was sold to me), I'll be forking out £1495 (less £250 voucher price which the optician threw in), so the damage will be £1245.

    Sure it's pretty expensive, but it should save me from worrying about making sure I always have a set of normal glasses, or prescription sunglasses with me wherever I venture out.

    Scary stuff indeed, but according to stat's, it's one of the safest procedures out there.
     
  9. bilabonic

    bilabonic VIP Member VIP Member

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    Had both mine done when Lasik first came out about 16/17 years ago, paid about £3200 then !!!

    Waas only 1 of 3 machines in the country offering bi-lateral treatment then .

    Very simple procedure, no pain, quick recovery and 20/20 vision since.

    DON;T even give it a thought !!!!! BEST thing i EVER done after ruining my eyes with poxy contacts lenses !!!

    Couple of drops in eye to numb it, wait a bit, lie down, clamps eye open (You can't even notice it, machine lifts a flap of eye (like a roller/cutter machine that rests on the eye, you then have to look at a red dot laser has a few blasts, you can smell a bit of burning, flap put back, sit in dark room for hour ...Job done.

    I was supposed to go back for check after a month but did not bother, also had option of another procedure/fix withing a year if not happy and had £200 voucher code that i give to a mate in work who had his done as well.

    Had to wear these bug eyed goggles things overnight in case you scratch your eye etc, and was given a pair of shades to drive home, woke up in morning and it was like a MIRACLE !!!

    DON'T have the cheaper procedure where they just laser the eye, recovery takes longer, can only do one eye at a time.

    Had mine done in Ultralase (think it was called in Cardiff)
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2016
  10. Napster

    Napster Global Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Mine turned out to be less invasive I had laser treatment on my right eye stuck on machine and had about 50 short shot is suppose its called to stop bleeding at back of my eye, a month later I had an implant at the back of my eye this is to replace injections every month and so far on last tests its working, only down side is I need glasses as damage was to great, I'm as blind as a bat in right eye without glasses, but that's a small price to pay :)

    PS next check-up is end of September will post back then :)
     
  11. mmrc01

    mmrc01 Premium Member Premium Member

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    I have been thinking about getting my eyes done but I keep reading stories about dry eyes, night vision problems etc. so I have been holding back. Maybe time to "look" again....
     
  12. Seedy_r0m

    Seedy_r0m Well-Known Member

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    I've got my consultation booked for tomorrow afternoon, then surgery a week later. I'm looking forward to it in a perverse sort of way.

    I was planning on getting zapped in the morning, then walking back to the office to finish off the rest of my shift. The Mrs thinks I'm mad for even thinking about going back to work, but I reckon I'll be OK. It's not as if I'm jogging home after a vasectomy. :)
     
  13. Seedy_r0m

    Seedy_r0m Well-Known Member

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    I had my consultation this afternoon.

    All was very pleasant and professional until the Surgeon said that it was my Right eye that was being treated. I said "No, it's my Left". He shook his head, looked slightly mifffed, and said that my notes state that it was my Right that had to undergo the procedure.

    I explained to him that my best eye for up close stuff is my Right, and that my Left is slightly blurry when reading newspapers, PC, Texts, Fitness band etc, so it would make more sense zapping my Left eye so that it could do the distance stuff while my Right would handle close up.

    He then folded up an A4 sheet of paper, tore a corner out of it, unfolded it and asked me to hold it in front of me and focus on a point on the far wall. He covered one eye, then the other to determine which of my eyes was the dominant one (it was my left as it 'appens), so he agreed with me that I should have surgery on my Left eye and keep my Right as is. I would have thought that in this day and age of being able to create a 3D map of the surface of my eye, that they would be able to determine which eye would be the prime candidate for surgery?

    To be honest, I'm a bit p1ssed that even after the array of tests carried out a few weeks ago, and also today, they still elected to zap my best eye rather than the one which required it most (albeit a very slight difference between the two). So if you are thinking of going through the same procedure, make sure you are 100% sure on what eye is to be operated on, and if there's any doubt, question it.

    I can only assume that the only reason that the original Optometrist chose to put my Right eye forward for Laser Surgery was that I mentioned that I would sometimes put a Contact Lens in my Right Eye before a night out in order that I could focus on the distance as well as close up. I did not mention that I would have preferred putting it in my Left eye, however it was not possible to keep it in this eye for any length of time due to the irritation it caused.

    I had planned being taking an early lunch, heading there to be zapped, then walking back to the office afterwards to finish off my shift, but apparently it isn't as simple as that, so Mrs R0m has stepped up to the mark and has kindly offered to ferry me homewards immeditely after the procedure.

    Fun thing to do today...to find out which eye is dominant, focus on a point in the near distance, bring your hands up in front of your face to block it out, then slowly create a small opening between your thumbs & forefingers so that you can see the object (TV Logo, light switch, socket etc), then move your hands slowly towards your eyes (without breaking your gaze) to find out your dominant eye (providing of course you aren't cross-dominant or one-eyed).
     
  14. river4ever

    river4ever VIP Member VIP Member Premium Member

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    WOW!!!!!

    Im sitting here and can't believe what I just read.
    Ripping holes in pieces of paper to find out what's the best eye ball to work on??!!
    Had you no previous appointments with a someone before they started "zapping your eye balls"?
    Im afraid mate at that stage I would of got up and made my way home.

    Thats is crazy.

    Sounds like something in a back street job.
     
  15. Seedy_r0m

    Seedy_r0m Well-Known Member

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    I had my surgery yesterday.

    I walked in 25 minutes early, was taken almost immediately for a quick chat, and to run another test on my (left) eye to make sure all was hunky dory. I then sat back down in the waiting room for a few minutes before being whisked away to the pre-op area, or should I say sasheyed away (snigger).

    Once there I was fitted for plastic overshoes, a natty hat, and a rather fetching gown. I had assumed that as I had seen umpteen movies and TV shows featuring hospital scenes, I would know how to put the gown on, but apparently I had it all wrong, so once I had apologised and put my clothes back on under the gown, I was ready to go.

    They placed me what looked like a dentists chair which had been reclined that much that it was horizontal. It brought me in mind of every single passenger who has ever sat in front of me during a flight.

    I positioned myself on the chair and the assistant put a couple of drops in my eye to numb it. At first it was cold and stung slightly, but it was more of a minor annoyance than anything else, so after a minute or so after that (so it seemed), she placed another drop or two in, but I didn't feel anything that time, so I was good to go.

    They swivelled me around and placed me under one of the machines for part #1 of the main procedure. I was asked to focus on a pinpoint of light. I felt something push against my eyeball for a few seconds while the assistance said "3-2-1". After that it was all over...a flap had been cut in my eyeball. I was kind of expecting someone to follow this up with "...and you're back in the room", however my main concern was that Ted Rogers had taken up residency in a Optical Surgery in Glasgow, however my fears were allayed once I remembered that he had passed away over 15 years ago during an Open-Heart surgery procedure.

    I still consider it uncanny that Ted passed over while on an operating table and I was reminded of his catchphrase when I was on an operating table. I've never been a great fan of his, but I do believe we now have a connection R.I.P. Ted, you were one of the best.

    Anyway...The surgeon then said "that's the sore part over with", which delighted me somewhat. And as it wasn't at all painful, was a bit of a bonus. To be honest, I knew that something was pressing against my eyeball, and it felt unnatural, but it was all over so quickly, I didn't have time to register it or do anything to counter the sensation. I knew that the weird sensation was beneficial (albeit feeling weird), and by the time I had processed and weighed these thoughts up & down, it was over and done with, and I was well on my way to recovery & 20/20 vision.

    Once completed, I was brought back again to the cental point between the two James Bond Villain Death Machines (sorry...Optical Enhancement Equipment Devices), where I lay for a moment to have other unnatural stuff done to my peep-hole.

    Although my vision in my left eye was blurred with the flap being cut, I could sense that stuff was still happening, and that this stage involved the surgeon peeling back the flap in order that the laser could do the biz.

    Part #2
    The surgeon then swivelled the chair to the other machine, and fitted me with a speculum. For the avoidance of doubt, this was an OPTICAL Speculum and not the other type, as that would be an entirely different operation altogether.

    I was reminded very briefly of Alex (A Clockwork Orange) while he was fitted with a speculum, however during his encounter, he was treated to all sorts of interesting visual delights, while in contrast I only had a flashing light and some blurred shapes as my visual entertainment.

    The Surgeon lined the laser up with my eye, while the delightful Ted Rogers impersonator once again announced "3-2-1", and that was that. The surgeon then cleaned the area, folded back the flap, and I was asked to go through to the post-op area where I wqs given my eye drops, night time gogggles, and after care instructions.

    On leaving the Surgery I could immediately see an improvement, but when I got into my car and my Wife started driving me home, the numbin gdrops started wearing off and I started feeling very slight discomfort.

    I can only describe the sensation as being like my eye being bruised, so I closed it during the journey home, but after an Ibuprofen and some eye drops, the feeling began to subside.

    On to the next day...

    I am am now able to drive and read without the need for glasses. I had surgery on one eye, so I have Omnivision. I'm delighted with it and am happy that I no longer need glasses.

    Best £1250 I have ever spent!!!

    This post brought to you by sheer elation, & a copious amount of Rum & Pep :)
     
  16. Spectre

    Spectre Administrator Staff Member Jnr Admin

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    I do not like the sound of this eyeball peeling device they have :|.
     
  17. Seedy_r0m

    Seedy_r0m Well-Known Member

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    Just imagine cutting a small, fine circle in a pickled onion, peeling it over and folding it back on itself, then after a few seconds returning it to where it once belonged.

    Honestly...you don't have time to think about what's happening, it's over and done with so quickly.

    Knowing then what I know now, I would have no hesitation in going through the procedure again.

    I've got a couple of different medicated eye drops to put in 4 x each day for the first week, as well as some artificial tears, but these are not causing me any problems. In addition to this, I've got to wear some fancy goggles to bed to minimise the risk of me rubbing my eye while I sleep.

    They're not the fanciest goggles I've ever worn, and look like a cross between Bono's spec's, and Ant-Mans shades, however seeing as I'm wearing them during the hours of darkness, no-one else will ever see me with them on. Besides, if my house is ever invaded during my recovery, I reckon I'll have the upper hand for the first few minutes as the intruder gets to grips wondering if I am indeed the real bona fide Ant-Man, or just a tribute act, thus garnering me some precious seconds while I affect my escape.

    on re-reading my posts, I think that my eyesight is the very least of my problems.
     
  18. Seedy_r0m

    Seedy_r0m Well-Known Member

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    Just to add...

    On my first day check-up after the op', the Optician took me into a darkened room and asked me if I could read the bottom line of a chart. Instead of reading it out, I asked her if she "had anything smaller?" She replaced the chart with a slightly smaller one, and I again I asked the question. This was repeated a few times until I got to a chart where it was at the very edge of my focus. I read the letters perfectly, and to my delight, the Optician announced that reading the top row perfectly would indicate 20/20 vision, however I was now a few levels beyond that.

    I'm still chuffed with the way it went, and have absolutely no regrets. My prescription was pretty light (-0.1 in a lens), so if I'm feeling this way after the procedure, then someone with a heavier prescription would be doing cartwheels about now (wearing Ant-Man glasses of course).

    I'm off to slip on my crime-fighting glasses, see you in the morrow citizens.
     
  19. SP0NGER0B

    SP0NGER0B New Member

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    It's incomprehensible the difference it can make. It can take your brain a couple of years to get used to the difference. I only had one eye LASIK'd and around two years later my brain acknowledged that my bad eye was now my good eye (slightly better than the other). Interestingly I had heard they had changed the way they did the surgery although reading your post it sounds identical to my procedure (which was 14 years ago) but I guess it varies case from case. It was concerning having to initial and sign the 14 page disclaimer before the surgery. One thing to watch out for though, is driving a dusk/night. You may experience the headlights bluring your vision, I meant to get some of those yellow driving glasses but never got around to doing so, I'm kinda used to it now!
     
  20. trevortron

    trevortron VIP Member VIP Member

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    Very interesting thread. Now that I am heading towards my mid-50's I am finding it increasingly difficult to focus on close-up stuff. Even the laptop is a struggle without reading spec's, and my policy of annually up-sizing my phone might soon mean I'll be answering calls on a full-size iPad! Low light is the biggest enemy and as I still work with small, intricate stuff, the failing sight is becoming increasingly frustrating.
    Now, most laser success stories I've read have been for short-sightedness. My far-sight is still very good, I certainly do not need spec's for driving. And I'd like to keep it that way.
    So does anyone know if the treatment can have the same miracle-benefits for far-sighters like myself?
     

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