Advice for a dslr.

kegnkiwi

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#1
Hi Guys

I am looking for a Dslr camera for beginner. I am currently living in the bay of islands in new zealand and there is some beautiful scenery. The problems I have is the cameras I have ie iphone and a minolta digital 6meg are just not cutting the mustard with regard to the shots I can take. I basically want to be able to to show people want the eye is seeing and capture the vivid colours ect. So while I am looking for a decent camera maybe its time to get a dslr. I see the cannon eos 1100d is on special on offer of the day. Is this any good?
 

Bronto

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#2
Its a good entry level Canon mate, will be far superior to what you have been using :) if it's in your price range go for it, general advice from me would be buy the best you can afford at the time you purchase ;)
 
Joined
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#3
Hi Guys

I am looking for a Dslr camera for beginner. I am currently living in the bay of islands in new zealand and there is some beautiful scenery. The problems I have is the cameras I have ie iphone and a minolta digital 6meg are just not cutting the mustard with regard to the shots I can take. I basically want to be able to to show people want the eye is seeing and capture the vivid colours ect. So while I am looking for a decent camera maybe its time to get a dslr. I see the cannon eos 1100d is on special on offer of the day. Is this any good?
If you can afford it, get an FX ( Full Frame) but not DX camera with a decent lens. The best way to buy a camera is to read a bit more about how each format works and the benefit you get from it and then choose your brand.

I’m a Nikon fan and I got both D700 (FX) and D300 (DX).
 

little_pob

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#4
I think you'll still be disappointed with the out-the-box results. Most digital cameras cannot capture the same dynamic range as the human eye... those that can have a feature called "High Dynamic Range" (HDR).

On-camera-HDR is done in one of 2 ways; each with their own draw backs.

  • "stacking" consecutive shots on top of each other - likely needs the additional expense of a tripod (although for landscape photography I'd recommend getting one anyway).
  • changing the exposure settings of a single image - tends not to give as good a final image as the stacking method.

Even if the cameras in your price range don't have an HDR function, you can also create HDR images yourself by taking multiple exposures and using software such as Photoshop CS5, Photomatix Pro or Picturenaut to build the HDR image. However, I'd also recommend that you pick up an IPS panel LCD/LED monitor and calibrate it correctly before you start trying to create colour accurate photographs.

I'm a fan of photo-realistic HDR images, but not of the more cartoon-y photos that it can produce. To me, you tend to lose the focal point in over processed HDR photographs - there is too much going on, and your eye doesn't settle on the subject matter.
 
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